Posts Tagged ‘Scotland’

Nicola Sturgeon to decide whether to save unlawful Brexit bill

Holyrood bill breaches law and Westminster holds sway over EU powers, supreme court rules

Nicola Sturgeon is facing an urgent decision on whether to salvage an emergency bill on Brexit after the supreme court ruled the Scottish legislation was unlawful.

The court, in a significant setback for the first minister, said that key parts of a continuity bill passed by Holyrood to repatriate EU powers in areas such as farming, fisheries and policing, breached UK law. Westminster, it ruled, had the ultimate say over EU legislation.

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News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018

News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018

BREAKING NEWS BREAKING NEWS 

Theresa May

ITV News
The threshold needed to trigger a vote of no-confidence in Theresa May has been exceeded after more than 48 Conservative MPs submitted letters to Sir Graham Brady. ITV News Political Editor Robert Peston said it was possible the no-confidence vote could be held on Wednesday. It follows reports of a wave of new letters amid anger at the way Mrs May dramatically put on hold the crunch Commons vote on her Brexit deal after admitting she was heading for a heavy defeat.

Sky News
Theresa May will face a vote of no confidence

Full statement from Sir Graham Brady:

The chairman of the backbench 1922 committee of Conservative MPs said: “The threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of confidence in the leader of the Conservative Party has been exceeded.  “In accordance with the rules, a ballot will be held between 1800 and 2000 on Wednesday 12th December in committee room 14 of the House of Commons.  “The votes will be counted immediately afterwards and an announcement will be made as soon as possible in the evening.  “Arrangements for the announcement will be released later today. 

WTO trade

Times
Theresa May will be put under pressure at her cabinet meeting today to start planning for a no-deal Brexit, with ministers around the table expecting a vote on her future to be called within hours. Cabinet members are set to push the prime minister to step up preparations for a hard Brexit as some claim that she has repeatedly stalled spending decisions to prepare for such an outcome. Mrs May faces intense speculation about her future after her decision on Monday to pull the vote on her Brexit deal to seek last-minute improvements from the EU.

Conservative leadership

Mirror
Theresa May has been plunged into crisis over Brexit – with speculation mounting that she could be ousted. Potential candidates for the leadership have begun setting out their stalls even while the Prime Minister is in office. And after she was forced to pull a Commons vote on her Brexit deal, she is looking more vulnerable than ever. A leadership contest can be forced in two ways – either Mrs May quits, or she’s challenged. If she resigns, candidates will put themselves forward. Tory MPs whittle them down one at a time to just two people, in votes each Tuesday and Thursday. Then the final two will go head to head in a vote by the Tories’ 100,000-or-so members. If she’s challenged, it’s a lot harder for a leadership contest to happen.

Times
Sajid Javid has touted his commitment to social mobility and Boris Johnson has compared his weight loss to the Brexit preparations as contenders to succeed Theresa May prepare their pitches for the top job. The home secretary and the former foreign secretary have used The Spectator to set out their views on Brexit and their party’s future, a decision which will doubtless be interpreted as preparation for a leadership contest. Mr Javid, seen in Westminster as the favourite among ministers to succeed Mrs May, told the magazine that the Conservative Party stood, in a word, for opportunity.

Mail
The beauty contest for the Tory leadership should Theresa May be forced from office began in earnest last night. Boris Johnson and Sajid Javid both appeared in the Tory-supporting Spectator magazine to make highly personal interventions as they vie for the top job. Their move comes as Mrs May faces the prospect of a no confidence vote in her leadership as early as this morning. The former foreign secretary used a column in the Spectator to open up about his recent weight loss – an intervention which is widely seen as laying the ground for a leadership bid.

Brexit

Express
SENIOR Tories last night called for Britain’s £39billion EU divorce fee to be cancelled after Brussels chiefs rejected Theresa May’s plea for a better Brexit deal. Eurosceptic MPs were furious when European Commission chief Jean–Claude Juncker insisted: “There is no room whatsoever for renegotiation.” The top Eurocrat’s rebuff was delivered as the Prime Minister came up against a wall of resistance on a whistlestop European tour seeking to win fresh concessions to assuage MPs blocking her deal. Leading Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, responding to the intransigence from Brussels, said: “If there is no room for renegotiation then we leave without a deal and do not pay the EU £39billion.”

Times
Theresa May’s pleas for changes to the Brexit divorce deal were publicly rejected by Europe’s leaders on her tour of continental capitals yesterday. The prime minister was rebuffed by German, Irish and Portuguese leaders as well as the EU’s two most senior officials after crisis talks in Brussels that were held before a critical European summit tomorrow. Mrs May dashed to The Hague for breakfast with Mark Rutte, the Dutch prime minister. Last Friday he had said that the deal on the table was “the bottom of the can. You really do not get anything better.”

Mirror
Theresa May’s frantic tour of European capitals ended in fresh humiliation tonight after the EU bluntly dismissed her call for more Brexit concessions. The Prime Minister begged EU leaders to bail her out of a mounting crisis as she desperately tried to win changes to her Brexit deal to buy off Tory rebels. It came amid frenzied speculation at Westminster that Mrs May faces a fresh bid from Brexiteers to oust her from Number 10. Senior Tory sources claimed that the 48 letters needed to kick off a no confidence vote in the PM had been reached – putting her premiership in jeopardy. EU president Jean-Claude Juncker dealt a heavy blow to the PM’s plans when he said there was “no room whatsoever” for re-opening talks.

Mail
Theresa May today pleaded with EU leaders for reassurances the controversial Irish backstop will only be temporary as she desperately tries to salvage her Brexit deal.  The PM embarked on a whirlwind tour of Europe today as she begged her fellow leaders to make major changes to the deal so she can buy off her Tory rebels. She met Dutch counterpart Mark Rutte for breakfast in the Hague, and held crucial talks with Angela Merkel in Berlin and later held talks with Donald Tusk. And she will later meet with Jean-Claude Juncker later today as they desperately try to find a way through the mounting crisis.
But she received a distinctly cool response from EU leaders who warned there is ‘no way’ the Withdrawal agreement can be changed. 

Independent
There is “no room whatsoever” to renegotiate the Brexit deal, the president of the European Commission has said, ahead of Theresa May’s trip to Brussels to seek concessions.  Speaking in the European Parliament on Tuesday Jean-Claude Juncker said re-opening the withdrawal agreement “will not happen”. He said the best the prime minister could hope for was “further clarity and further interpretations without reopening the withdrawal agreement” when she meets EU leaders in Brussels this week. Ms May is desperate to gain concessions from the EU on the deal she struck last month after it was given an overwhelmingly hostile reception by MPs.

Guardian
Jean-Claude Juncker has said there is “no room whatsoever” for renegotiating the Brexit deal as Theresa May returns to Brussels in an attempt to reopen talks. The prime minister embarked on a frantic round ofdiplomacy with other EU leaders on Tuesday to try to salvage some concessions, but the European commission president reiterated that Brussels would not revisit the withdrawal agreement. 
Junker offered May only additional “clarifications and interpretations” of the contentious backstop solution, designed to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland.

Times
Theresa May will meet Leo Varadkar in Dublin today as the British prime minister continues her charm offensive against European Union leaders in an effort to break the Brexit deadlock. Her plea for changes to Britain’s Brexit divorce deal was rejected by European leaders yesterday during her tour of continental capitals. Mrs May has been repeatedly rebuffed before a European summit tomorrow by German and Portuguese leaders as well as the EU’s two most senior officials after crisis talks in Brussels. In the Dáil, the taoiseach gave a sense of the message he is expected to deliver to Mrs May.

Sun
BRUSSELS is set to pile the pressure on Theresa May to switch tack to a softer Brexit in return for greater assurances on the backstop. Euro Mps will push for the UK to accept a Norway-style trading relationship as the best way to avoid the hated border solution ever coming into force. Their demand came as eurocrats and EU leaders told the PM in no uncertain terms they will never reopen the terms of the backstop. German MEP Manfred Weber, who is in the running to be the next Commission president, said he would push for a “Norway Plus” deal to unblock talks. He said: “We can clarify again that hopefully the backstop will not be needed in the future.

Second referendum

Mail
Liam Fox hinted at the prospect of a new referendum on Brexit today as he warned campaigners any poll would not have Remain on the current terms on the ballot. The International Trade Secretary risked irritating No 10 by accepting the possibility of a new vote despite Theresa May repeatedly ruling it out. Mr Fox accused campaigners demanding a vote of seeking to re-run the 2016 referendum to get the ‘right’ result. And he said ‘any further referendum’ would not have the ‘status quo’ on offer because the EU was constantly evolving to ‘ever closer union’. Mr Fox also warned campaigners there was not enough time to deliver a referendum before exit day on March 29, 2019, in a piece for the Telegraph today.

Scotland

Mail
The SNP today vowed to to put down there own confidence motion to bring try and topple Theresa May if Jeremy Corbyn refuses to by the end of the day. Nicola Sturgeon said that if this vote does not succeed in forcing a general election, she wanted Labour to go on to support a second referendum. And Ian Blackford, the party’s leader in Westminster, repeated the threat, as he appeared next to the Lib Dems, Greens and Welsh nationalists Plaid Cym
ru. The parties have all written to the Labour leader to demand that he calls the crunch vote in Mrs May. 

Times
Labour has not costed any of the alternative policies it has proposed for today’s Scottish budget. Derek Mackay, the finance secretary, will unveil his draft budget with no clear sign of where he will find the required support from opposition parties to pass the document in the new year. Labour has produced a video summarising its pre-budget demands, which include increased funding for councils; a £5 per week increase in child benefit; a freeze on rail fares; a women’s health fund; £10 million for discretionary housing payments; and a £20million community policing fund. Last year the party set out a fully costed alternative to the Scottish government’s offer but sources told The Times that would not be repeated this year.

Bercow

Mail (by Andrew Pierce)
On Monday, as he left the Commons after Theresa May‘s humiliating climbdown over the Brexit withdrawal deal, Jeremy Corbyn stopped by the Speaker’s chair. To the astonishment of several onlookers, the Labour leader addressed its beaming occupant, John Bercow. ‘Thank you for all your help,’ he said. The gushing praise confirmed the Tories’ worst fears: Bercow has abandoned all pretence of impartiality and is manipulating Commons procedures to undermine the Government on Brexit at every possible turn. Minutes earlier, Bercow had accused Mrs May of being ‘deeply discourteous’ in pulling the ‘meaningful’ vote on the Government’s deal scheduled for that evening. In an extraordinary reprimand directed at the PM, the Speaker urged ministers to put the decision to delay it to an MPs’ vote.

France

Telegraph
Emmanuel Macron’s bid to buy off France’s “gilets jaunes” protesters with instant budget handouts threatens to blast through eurozone’s fiscal limits, fatally damaging his credibility as the champion of the European project and the guardian of French public accounts. The package of short-term measures announced in a theatrical mea culpa on Monday night leaves President Macron’s putative “grand bargain” with Germany in tatters. He had pledged root-and-branch reform of the French economy and a restoration of spending discipline after 11 years in breach of the EU’s Stability Pact. The calculation was that Berlin would in return drop its long-standing opposition to fiscal union and shared liabilities.

Mail
Yellow Vest protesters demanded even more concessions from Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday even after he caved in to their demands for more pay and lower taxes with a £9billion spending splurge on Monday night. Thomas Miralles, a Yellow Vest spokesman in the southern Pyrenees-Orientales department, said Macron had failed to listen to protesters and vowed to come to Paris this Saturday for his first demonstration in the capital. Meanwhile thousands of students angered by Macron’s education reforms joined the Yellow Vests on the streets for a ‘black Tuesday’ of unrest, further complicating matters for the French President.

Times
President Macron’s €10 billion hand-out appears to have bought him respite from a month of violent protests, but at the cost of busting his budget and shattering his credibility in Europe. The government confirmed that the financial measures offered by Mr Macron in a television address on Monday night, including a €100-a-week rise in the minimum wage, would knock a hole in the 2019 budget and “temporarily” breach the EU’s deficit ceiling of 3 per cent of national income. The European Commission said it would be keeping a close eye on France, a humiliating statement in the light of Mr Macron’s previous pride in returning to fiscal rigour.

NHS

Mail
The NHS‘s lack of cyber security is ‘alarming’, experts have warned after they discovered huge gaps in spending and training across the health service. Too few experts could put the NHS at risk of another cyber attack like last year’s £92million WannaCry disaster in which 20,000 hospital appointments were cancelled. Spending on cyber security varies wildly between hospital trusts around the country, with some spending as little as £238 and others £78,000. 
On average the health service employs just one qualified cyber security expert for every 2,582 employees, and a quarter of trusts don’t have any at all.

Military

Times
Britain must shift away from a peacetime mentality and embrace the innovation associated with wartime to combat rapid technological change and an array of national threats, the head of the military has said. General Sir Nick Carter, 59, warned last night that instability was the defining condition of the age and threats were “diversifying, proliferating and intensifying very rapidly”. In his first lecture as chief of the defence staff at the Royal United Services Institute, he said that, alongside threats posed by Russia, China, Iran and terrorist networks such as Islamic State, population change heralded trouble. Mass migration was “arguably an existential threat to Europe” compounded by populism and nationalism, which had a “bellicose nature”, he said.

Wages

Times
Wages grew at their fastest pace in a decade in the three months to October and the number of people in work has reached a record high, official figures show. Regular pay, excluding bonuses, grew by an average of 3.3 per cent in the period, up from 3.2 per cent in the three months to September, according to the Office for National Statistics. After adjusting for inflation, regular wages grew 1 per cent in the October period, a level not reached since the final quarter of 2016. Wages have been growing faster than inflation for nine months. After a decade of wage stagnation analysts said that the tightness of the labour market was beginning to cause sustained pay growth.

Cancer

Times
Thousands of men with suspected prostate cancer will avoid invasive biopsies after the treatments watchdog ruled that they must first be offered MRI scans. Experts say that the guidance could allow up to 40 per cent of men who need a diagnosis to avoid a biopsy, which is potentially painful and has unpleasant side-effects. The ruling from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) is the first formal recommendation for the technology in any country. While many hospitals offer multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) as a first-line test for men, 50 per cent of patients miss out, according to the charity Prostate Cancer UK. 
About 130 new prostate cancer cases are diagnosed daily in the UK.

Fracking

Times
Cuadrilla has been forced to pause fracking after the strongest earthquake to date caused by its operations was felt over a wide area. A 1.5 magnitude tremor happened at about 11.20am yesterday after several smaller tremors earlier in the day. It was the biggest of more than 30 tremors caused by Cuadrilla since it began fracking at Preston New Road, Lancashire, in October. Under the government’s “traffic light” system, designed to prevent more serious earthquakes, the company has to stop fracking for 18 hours after a tremor of more than 0.5. It was the second tremor to be felt at the surface, following a previous one of 1.1 magnitude on October 29, according to the British Geological Survey (BGS).

Rail travel

Telegraph
If all had gone to plan, the first paying passengers to travel through Crossrail’s 13-mile tunnels, 40 metres beneath the streets of central London, would have been climbing aboard this month.   The ambitious scheme, one of the biggest infrastructure projects in Europe, is projected to add £42bn to the economy and bring 1.5m extra people within a 45-minute commute to central London. But on Monday, after a series of delays and setbacks, authorities confirmed it is likely to run billions of pounds over budget and they can no longer say with any confidence when it will be ready to open.

The post News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018 appeared first on UKIP Daily | UKIP News | UKIP Debate.

News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018

News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018

BREAKING NEWS BREAKING NEWS 

Theresa May

ITV News
The threshold needed to trigger a vote of no-confidence in Theresa May has been exceeded after more than 48 Conservative MPs submitted letters to Sir Graham Brady. ITV News Political Editor Robert Peston said it was possible the no-confidence vote could be held on Wednesday. It follows reports of a wave of new letters amid anger at the way Mrs May dramatically put on hold the crunch Commons vote on her Brexit deal after admitting she was heading for a heavy defeat.

Sky News
Theresa May will face a vote of no confidence

Full statement from Sir Graham Brady:

The chairman of the backbench 1922 committee of Conservative MPs said: “The threshold of 15% of the parliamentary party seeking a vote of confidence in the leader of the Conservative Party has been exceeded.  “In accordance with the rules, a ballot will be held between 1800 and 2000 on Wednesday 12th December in committee room 14 of the House of Commons.  “The votes will be counted immediately afterwards and an announcement will be made as soon as possible in the evening.  “Arrangements for the announcement will be released later today. 

WTO trade

Times
Theresa May will be put under pressure at her cabinet meeting today to start planning for a no-deal Brexit, with ministers around the table expecting a vote on her future to be called within hours. Cabinet members are set to push the prime minister to step up preparations for a hard Brexit as some claim that she has repeatedly stalled spending decisions to prepare for such an outcome. Mrs May faces intense speculation about her future after her decision on Monday to pull the vote on her Brexit deal to seek last-minute improvements from the EU.

Conservative leadership

Mirror
Theresa May has been plunged into crisis over Brexit – with speculation mounting that she could be ousted. Potential candidates for the leadership have begun setting out their stalls even while the Prime Minister is in office. And after she was forced to pull a Commons vote on her Brexit deal, she is looking more vulnerable than ever. A leadership contest can be forced in two ways – either Mrs May quits, or she’s challenged. If she resigns, candidates will put themselves forward. Tory MPs whittle them down one at a time to just two people, in votes each Tuesday and Thursday. Then the final two will go head to head in a vote by the Tories’ 100,000-or-so members. If she’s challenged, it’s a lot harder for a leadership contest to happen.

Times
Sajid Javid has touted his commitment to social mobility and Boris Johnson has compared his weight loss to the Brexit preparations as contenders to succeed Theresa May prepare their pitches for the top job. The home secretary and the former foreign secretary have used The Spectator to set out their views on Brexit and their party’s future, a decision which will doubtless be interpreted as preparation for a leadership contest. Mr Javid, seen in Westminster as the favourite among ministers to succeed Mrs May, told the magazine that the Conservative Party stood, in a word, for opportunity.

Mail
The beauty contest for the Tory leadership should Theresa May be forced from office began in earnest last night. Boris Johnson and Sajid Javid both appeared in the Tory-supporting Spectator magazine to make highly personal interventions as they vie for the top job. Their move comes as Mrs May faces the prospect of a no confidence vote in her leadership as early as this morning. The former foreign secretary used a column in the Spectator to open up about his recent weight loss – an intervention which is widely seen as laying the ground for a leadership bid.

Brexit

Express
SENIOR Tories last night called for Britain’s £39billion EU divorce fee to be cancelled after Brussels chiefs rejected Theresa May’s plea for a better Brexit deal. Eurosceptic MPs were furious when European Commission chief Jean–Claude Juncker insisted: “There is no room whatsoever for renegotiation.” The top Eurocrat’s rebuff was delivered as the Prime Minister came up against a wall of resistance on a whistlestop European tour seeking to win fresh concessions to assuage MPs blocking her deal. Leading Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, responding to the intransigence from Brussels, said: “If there is no room for renegotiation then we leave without a deal and do not pay the EU £39billion.”

Times
Theresa May’s pleas for changes to the Brexit divorce deal were publicly rejected by Europe’s leaders on her tour of continental capitals yesterday. The prime minister was rebuffed by German, Irish and Portuguese leaders as well as the EU’s two most senior officials after crisis talks in Brussels that were held before a critical European summit tomorrow. Mrs May dashed to The Hague for breakfast with Mark Rutte, the Dutch prime minister. Last Friday he had said that the deal on the table was “the bottom of the can. You really do not get anything better.”

Mirror
Theresa May’s frantic tour of European capitals ended in fresh humiliation tonight after the EU bluntly dismissed her call for more Brexit concessions. The Prime Minister begged EU leaders to bail her out of a mounting crisis as she desperately tried to win changes to her Brexit deal to buy off Tory rebels. It came amid frenzied speculation at Westminster that Mrs May faces a fresh bid from Brexiteers to oust her from Number 10. Senior Tory sources claimed that the 48 letters needed to kick off a no confidence vote in the PM had been reached – putting her premiership in jeopardy. EU president Jean-Claude Juncker dealt a heavy blow to the PM’s plans when he said there was “no room whatsoever” for re-opening talks.

Mail
Theresa May today pleaded with EU leaders for reassurances the controversial Irish backstop will only be temporary as she desperately tries to salvage her Brexit deal.  The PM embarked on a whirlwind tour of Europe today as she begged her fellow leaders to make major changes to the deal so she can buy off her Tory rebels. She met Dutch counterpart Mark Rutte for breakfast in the Hague, and held crucial talks with Angela Merkel in Berlin and later held talks with Donald Tusk. And she will later meet with Jean-Claude Juncker later today as they desperately try to find a way through the mounting crisis.
But she received a distinctly cool response from EU leaders who warned there is ‘no way’ the Withdrawal agreement can be changed. 

Independent
There is “no room whatsoever” to renegotiate the Brexit deal, the president of the European Commission has said, ahead of Theresa May’s trip to Brussels to seek concessions.  Speaking in the European Parliament on Tuesday Jean-Claude Juncker said re-opening the withdrawal agreement “will not happen”. He said the best the prime minister could hope for was “further clarity and further interpretations without reopening the withdrawal agreement” when she meets EU leaders in Brussels this week. Ms May is desperate to gain concessions from the EU on the deal she struck last month after it was given an overwhelmingly hostile reception by MPs.

Guardian
Jean-Claude Juncker has said there is “no room whatsoever” for renegotiating the Brexit deal as Theresa May returns to Brussels in an attempt to reopen talks. The prime minister embarked on a frantic round ofdiplomacy with other EU leaders on Tuesday to try to salvage some concessions, but the European commission president reiterated that Brussels would not revisit the withdrawal agreement. 
Junker offered May only additional “clarifications and interpretations” of the contentious backstop solution, designed to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland.

Times
Theresa May will meet Leo Varadkar in Dublin today as the British prime minister continues her charm offensive against European Union leaders in an effort to break the Brexit deadlock. Her plea for changes to Britain’s Brexit divorce deal was rejected by European leaders yesterday during her tour of continental capitals. Mrs May has been repeatedly rebuffed before a European summit tomorrow by German and Portuguese leaders as well as the EU’s two most senior officials after crisis talks in Brussels. In the Dáil, the taoiseach gave a sense of the message he is expected to deliver to Mrs May.

Sun
BRUSSELS is set to pile the pressure on Theresa May to switch tack to a softer Brexit in return for greater assurances on the backstop. Euro Mps will push for the UK to accept a Norway-style trading relationship as the best way to avoid the hated border solution ever coming into force. Their demand came as eurocrats and EU leaders told the PM in no uncertain terms they will never reopen the terms of the backstop. German MEP Manfred Weber, who is in the running to be the next Commission president, said he would push for a “Norway Plus” deal to unblock talks. He said: “We can clarify again that hopefully the backstop will not be needed in the future.

Second referendum

Mail
Liam Fox hinted at the prospect of a new referendum on Brexit today as he warned campaigners any poll would not have Remain on the current terms on the ballot. The International Trade Secretary risked irritating No 10 by accepting the possibility of a new vote despite Theresa May repeatedly ruling it out. Mr Fox accused campaigners demanding a vote of seeking to re-run the 2016 referendum to get the ‘right’ result. And he said ‘any further referendum’ would not have the ‘status quo’ on offer because the EU was constantly evolving to ‘ever closer union’. Mr Fox also warned campaigners there was not enough time to deliver a referendum before exit day on March 29, 2019, in a piece for the Telegraph today.

Scotland

Mail
The SNP today vowed to to put down there own confidence motion to bring try and topple Theresa May if Jeremy Corbyn refuses to by the end of the day. Nicola Sturgeon said that if this vote does not succeed in forcing a general election, she wanted Labour to go on to support a second referendum. And Ian Blackford, the party’s leader in Westminster, repeated the threat, as he appeared next to the Lib Dems, Greens and Welsh nationalists Plaid Cym
ru. The parties have all written to the Labour leader to demand that he calls the crunch vote in Mrs May. 

Times
Labour has not costed any of the alternative policies it has proposed for today’s Scottish budget. Derek Mackay, the finance secretary, will unveil his draft budget with no clear sign of where he will find the required support from opposition parties to pass the document in the new year. Labour has produced a video summarising its pre-budget demands, which include increased funding for councils; a £5 per week increase in child benefit; a freeze on rail fares; a women’s health fund; £10 million for discretionary housing payments; and a £20million community policing fund. Last year the party set out a fully costed alternative to the Scottish government’s offer but sources told The Times that would not be repeated this year.

Bercow

Mail (by Andrew Pierce)
On Monday, as he left the Commons after Theresa May‘s humiliating climbdown over the Brexit withdrawal deal, Jeremy Corbyn stopped by the Speaker’s chair. To the astonishment of several onlookers, the Labour leader addressed its beaming occupant, John Bercow. ‘Thank you for all your help,’ he said. The gushing praise confirmed the Tories’ worst fears: Bercow has abandoned all pretence of impartiality and is manipulating Commons procedures to undermine the Government on Brexit at every possible turn. Minutes earlier, Bercow had accused Mrs May of being ‘deeply discourteous’ in pulling the ‘meaningful’ vote on the Government’s deal scheduled for that evening. In an extraordinary reprimand directed at the PM, the Speaker urged ministers to put the decision to delay it to an MPs’ vote.

France

Telegraph
Emmanuel Macron’s bid to buy off France’s “gilets jaunes” protesters with instant budget handouts threatens to blast through eurozone’s fiscal limits, fatally damaging his credibility as the champion of the European project and the guardian of French public accounts. The package of short-term measures announced in a theatrical mea culpa on Monday night leaves President Macron’s putative “grand bargain” with Germany in tatters. He had pledged root-and-branch reform of the French economy and a restoration of spending discipline after 11 years in breach of the EU’s Stability Pact. The calculation was that Berlin would in return drop its long-standing opposition to fiscal union and shared liabilities.

Mail
Yellow Vest protesters demanded even more concessions from Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday even after he caved in to their demands for more pay and lower taxes with a £9billion spending splurge on Monday night. Thomas Miralles, a Yellow Vest spokesman in the southern Pyrenees-Orientales department, said Macron had failed to listen to protesters and vowed to come to Paris this Saturday for his first demonstration in the capital. Meanwhile thousands of students angered by Macron’s education reforms joined the Yellow Vests on the streets for a ‘black Tuesday’ of unrest, further complicating matters for the French President.

Times
President Macron’s €10 billion hand-out appears to have bought him respite from a month of violent protests, but at the cost of busting his budget and shattering his credibility in Europe. The government confirmed that the financial measures offered by Mr Macron in a television address on Monday night, including a €100-a-week rise in the minimum wage, would knock a hole in the 2019 budget and “temporarily” breach the EU’s deficit ceiling of 3 per cent of national income. The European Commission said it would be keeping a close eye on France, a humiliating statement in the light of Mr Macron’s previous pride in returning to fiscal rigour.

NHS

Mail
The NHS‘s lack of cyber security is ‘alarming’, experts have warned after they discovered huge gaps in spending and training across the health service. Too few experts could put the NHS at risk of another cyber attack like last year’s £92million WannaCry disaster in which 20,000 hospital appointments were cancelled. Spending on cyber security varies wildly between hospital trusts around the country, with some spending as little as £238 and others £78,000. 
On average the health service employs just one qualified cyber security expert for every 2,582 employees, and a quarter of trusts don’t have any at all.

Military

Times
Britain must shift away from a peacetime mentality and embrace the innovation associated with wartime to combat rapid technological change and an array of national threats, the head of the military has said. General Sir Nick Carter, 59, warned last night that instability was the defining condition of the age and threats were “diversifying, proliferating and intensifying very rapidly”. In his first lecture as chief of the defence staff at the Royal United Services Institute, he said that, alongside threats posed by Russia, China, Iran and terrorist networks such as Islamic State, population change heralded trouble. Mass migration was “arguably an existential threat to Europe” compounded by populism and nationalism, which had a “bellicose nature”, he said.

Wages

Times
Wages grew at their fastest pace in a decade in the three months to October and the number of people in work has reached a record high, official figures show. Regular pay, excluding bonuses, grew by an average of 3.3 per cent in the period, up from 3.2 per cent in the three months to September, according to the Office for National Statistics. After adjusting for inflation, regular wages grew 1 per cent in the October period, a level not reached since the final quarter of 2016. Wages have been growing faster than inflation for nine months. After a decade of wage stagnation analysts said that the tightness of the labour market was beginning to cause sustained pay growth.

Cancer

Times
Thousands of men with suspected prostate cancer will avoid invasive biopsies after the treatments watchdog ruled that they must first be offered MRI scans. Experts say that the guidance could allow up to 40 per cent of men who need a diagnosis to avoid a biopsy, which is potentially painful and has unpleasant side-effects. The ruling from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) is the first formal recommendation for the technology in any country. While many hospitals offer multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) as a first-line test for men, 50 per cent of patients miss out, according to the charity Prostate Cancer UK. 
About 130 new prostate cancer cases are diagnosed daily in the UK.

Fracking

Times
Cuadrilla has been forced to pause fracking after the strongest earthquake to date caused by its operations was felt over a wide area. A 1.5 magnitude tremor happened at about 11.20am yesterday after several smaller tremors earlier in the day. It was the biggest of more than 30 tremors caused by Cuadrilla since it began fracking at Preston New Road, Lancashire, in October. Under the government’s “traffic light” system, designed to prevent more serious earthquakes, the company has to stop fracking for 18 hours after a tremor of more than 0.5. It was the second tremor to be felt at the surface, following a previous one of 1.1 magnitude on October 29, according to the British Geological Survey (BGS).

Rail travel

Telegraph
If all had gone to plan, the first paying passengers to travel through Crossrail’s 13-mile tunnels, 40 metres beneath the streets of central London, would have been climbing aboard this month.   The ambitious scheme, one of the biggest infrastructure projects in Europe, is projected to add £42bn to the economy and bring 1.5m extra people within a 45-minute commute to central London. But on Monday, after a series of delays and setbacks, authorities confirmed it is likely to run billions of pounds over budget and they can no longer say with any confidence when it will be ready to open.

The post News review – Wednesday 12 December 2018 appeared first on UKIP Daily | UKIP News | UKIP Debate.

Brexit: May rules out revoking article 50 after ECJ ruling

Britain can stop Brexit process without approval of member states, court of justice says

Theresa May has ruled out abandoning Brexit after the European court ruled that the UK could stop the article 50 process without seeking EU approval.

The court in Luxembourg delighted remain campaigners by issuing an emergency ruling on Monday morning that under EU law, the UK was able to unilaterally halt the article 50 process – fuelling renewed calls for a second referendum.

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News review – Monday 10 December 2018

News review – Monday 10 December 2018

Brexit

Telegraph
Theresa May held 11th-hour crisis talks with EU leaders on Sunday as she agonised over whether to postpone Tuesday’s “doomed” vote on her Brexit deal. With time rapidly running out, Mrs May phoned Donald Tusk, the European Council president, to explain that MPs would kill off the deal – and possibly her premiership – unless Brussels could throw her a lifeline. Mrs May also called Leo Varadkar, the Irish Taoiseach, to discuss the vote and Thursday’s summit in Brussels. Mr Varadkar’s support is crucial if Mrs May is to win any concessions on the Irish backstop – the biggest obstacle to getting her deal through Parliament. 

Mail
Brexiteers were urged to ‘take the deal and get out’ of the European Union as MPs clashed on Channel 4’s Brexit debate show tonight. Ahead of Tuesday’s crucial Commons vote, Tory deputy chairman James Cleverly made the plea in support of Theresa May’s deal, arguing that it delivered on what people voted for. However he was opposed by arch-Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg, Labour shadow cabinet minister Barry Gardiner and Green MP Caroline Lucas as they set out rival visions for the way ahead- almost 900 days after the country voted to leave. The four speakers made opening and closing statements in front of a live studio audience, with Ms Lucas sharing her support for a People’s Vote and Mr Rees-Mogg making the case for a complete break away from the EU.

Independent
Theresa May is set for the bleakest week of her time in power after leadership rivals publicly positioned themselves to grab the Tory crown if her Brexit plans collapse. Ex-cabinet ministers Boris Johnson, Dominic Raab and Esther McVey all signalled a willingness to bid for the leadership amid speculation that Ms May faces a heavy defeat in the crunch Commons vote on her proposed Brexit deal. More resignations were expected from the front bench in the run-up to the vote, with government insiders indicating it could still be delayed. If she survives the first half of the week, Ms May is expected to head to Brussels where she will implore the EU to offer a concession on the hated “Irish backstop” so that she can try to sell the deal to Tory rebels one last time. The prime minister spoke to president of the European Council Donald Tusk on Sunday, who said afterwards that it would be “an important week for the fate of Brexit”.

EU

Telegraph
A shadowy EU official who once described Brexit as “stupid” and is known in Brussels as “the monster” has reportedly told friends he wants to take charge of trade negotiations with the UK.  Martin Selmayr, a former German lawyer who is infamous in EU circles for his Machiavellian management style, hopes to lead the Brexit talks after March 2019, according to the Sun on Sunday. “Selmayr wants to send Barnier off into the horizon and leave it open who will head up trade negotiations with the UK,” an EU source told the newspaper. “He’s very keen to take that position for himself.” A European Commission spokesman dismissed the claims.

Express
JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker’s Brexit-hating former deputy is reportedly seeking to become the EU’s next Brexit negotiator – and could use the position to strong-arm the UK in trade talks. Sources in Brussels say Martin Selmayr is positioning himself to succeed Michel Barnier, The Sun reports. As Secretary-General of the European Commission, Mr Selmayr currently serves as the EU’s top civil servant and is responsible for no deal planning. But he would reportedly “go hard” on Britain in trade talks if he took over from Mr Barnier in a bid to cement his position as a key player in Brussels. However the Commission has vehemently denied the rumours, which are said to be widely circulating in the Belgian capital, and insisted Mr Selmayr has no interest in taking on the role.

Independent
The European Union will renegotiate with Theresa May if she loses the crunch vote on her Brexit deal on 11 December, according to a former European Commission president.  Romano Prodi, who served in the role from 1999 to 2004, said it was crucial that the European Union took steps to avoid the negative consequences of the UK crashing out of the bloc without a deal in March, which would become a significant possibility if Ms May loses the vote this week.  The comments are in direct contradiction to the current commission president Jean-Claude Juncker who has repeatedly said that Ms May’s deal is the only one on offer.  Mr Juncker has told MPs who are considering voting down the agreement in the hope they can secure a better deal that they will be left “disappointed” if they do so. Mr Prodi however claimed that if the situation where Ms May is unable to get her deal through the Commons the EU would respond by going back to the negotiating table.

Express
THE European Court of Justice has ruled the UK can unilaterally revoke Article 50 – but what does that mean for Brexit? Today’s ruling by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) was made shortly after 8am by 28 judges in the space of 20 seconds. The decision comes one day before Prime Minister Theresa May’s crunch vote on the Brexit deal. In an emergency judgement, the Court of Justice said: “The United Kingdom is free to revoke unilaterally the notification of its intention to withdraw from the EU.” The ruling is in line with an opinion made last week by court legal adviser Manuel Campos Sanchez-Bordona.

Times
Theresa May is facing the prospect of a leadership battle with the 48 letters from MPs that would trigger a contest likely to be submitted this week, The Times has been told. Tory challengers broke cover to set out their leadership pitches yesterday before the most difficult week of Mrs May’s troubled premiership. Boris Johnson tried to put himself at the head of a jockeying pack by outlining plans for another negotiation with Brussels. Other former ministers refused to rule themselves out of a contest. Some cabinet ministers were clinging to a fast-fading hope that the prime minster would postpone tomorrow’s so-called meaningful vote on her Brexit deal as whips calculated that she was heading for a three-figure defeat.

Express
THERESA May has been put on alert for a possible leadership coup after a top Tory rival revealed she would consider leading the party if asked. Esther McVey, who resigned from Theresa May’s cabinet last month over the proposed Brexit deal, refused to rule out running for leadership this morning. Speaking on Sky News, she said, if asked, she would give the idea of leadership serious thought. She told Sophy Ridge: “If people asked me, then of course I would give it serious thought… if people asked me. “But at the moment I’m looking at who is in papers, who we can get behind but it shouldn’t be about the personality, it should be about the country and this deal.”

Westmonster
Theresa May will be under huge pressure to quit as Prime Minister after her deal is likely defeated next week, with an attempt to oust her on the cards. Cabinet Ministers have warned her that she will have to quit if her deal is defeated and she fails to renegotiate a better deal with the European Union, according to The Telegraph. May has been steadfast in insisting that there can be no renegotiation and that her deal is the final offer. Either she has to advocate a No Deal when MPs reject her plan, or leave it to a new PM. Meanwhile Tory, DUP and Labour MPs are plotting a vote against May’s leadership of the country as they seek to take her down, reports The Times. A vote expressing no confidence in her ability could be potentially devastating.

Project Fear

Breitbart
Former International Monetary Fund (IMF) director Ashoka Mody has poured scorn on the anti-Brexit forecasts produced by officials recently, suggesting they are “making up the numbers”. The Indian-born economist and Princeton University professor savaged the extreme, negative “No Deal” Brexit scenarios which have been pushed out by the Bank of England, led by Goldman Sach  alumnus Mark Carney, and Her Majesty’s Treasury, led by Chancellor Philip “Remainer Phil” Hammond, as having “no basis in economic theory or empirical findings.” “The Bank of England’s prediction that civilisation will end with Brexit is merely an effort to outdo in shrillness similar analyses by the Treasury and the IMF,” he mocked in an article published on the Independent website.

Breitbart
The Chief Executive of the United Kingdom Major Ports Group has shot down claims of a six-month “logjam” at Britain’s ports in the event of a “No Deal” Brexit in flames. Writing to the
Telegraph newspaper “on behalf of the United Kingdom’s major port operators, responsible for handling 75 per cent of the country’s seaborne trade”, Tim Morris was highly dismissive of headlines suggesting a clean break with the EU on World Trade Organization (WTO) terms — “No Deal” — would result in trade seizing up. Morris noted that while the Port of Dover could face certain “risk factors” due to its “unique” circumstances, it only handles 6 percent of British port volumes, and the same issues do not exist at Britain’s other major trade hubs.

Labour Party

Telegraph
Labour has hatched a plan to topple Theresa May rather than directly target the Government, with insiders confirming senior figures have held discussions with the Democratic Unionist Party. Sources close to Jeremy Corbyn have told
The Daily Telegraph that members of the two parties have discussed tabling a no confidence motion in the Prime Minister, in a move Labour hopes will unite the warring factions in Parliament against her. Whilst Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit Secretary, last week said it was “inevitable” that Labour would press for a no confidence vote in the Government, party insiders fear that doing so would cause Tory Brexiteers and Remainers to close ranks.

ITV News
Jeremy Corbyn has given his strongest signal yet that Remain would be on the ballot paper in a second referendum. Speaking exclusively to ITV News, the Labour leader added that he remains determined to mount a no confidence motion against the Prime Minister next week, whether she pulls Tuesday’s Brexit vote or not, or even if it fails to get voted through the House of Commons by MPs. Mr Corbyn said he does not believe Theresa May’s Brexit deal will be passed, branding it “ridiculous”, and saying that “it’s not going to work, everybody knows that”.

Scotland

Telegraph
The SNP’s Finance Minister has come under further pressure to rule out middle-class tax rises in this week’s Scottish Budget after it emerged he has received the UK’s third highest funding increase. The Scottish Tories highlighted official figures showing the Chancellor’s spending announcements have handed the SNP government an extra £1.6 billion for next year. They said the Treasury’s Red Book, produced with each UK Budget, showed the only spending areas to get a larger rise from Philip Hammond are the English NHS and transport. Murdo Fraser, their Shadow Finance Minister, said the figures demonstrated that Derek Mackay has enough spending money without having to further increase taxes.

Express
ALMOST 60 percent of Scots believe it would be better for their country to gain independence rather than remain in the UK after a no-deal Brexit, a new poll has indicated. Of the 1,028 people surveyed, nearly three in five (59 percent) said leaving the union would be more beneficial than staying if the UK departs the EU without a Withdrawal Agreement. And 53 percent said Scotland would be better off going it alone even if the Prime Minister gets her Brexit deal through Parliament. The research was carried out by Panelbase for The Sunday Times Scotland and LBC in the run up to a Commons vote on Tuesday in which MPs are expected to shoot down Theresa May’s proposals.  But the shocking results did not translate into a majority for independence, with support for this at 47 percent in the poll – up from 44 percent who voted to leave in the 2014 referendum. 

Marrakesh

Breitbart
“Marrakech C’est Non!” says one of the banners wielded by the
Gilets Jaunes at the protests in Paris this weekend: “No to Marrakesh!” This refers, of course, to the United Nations conference in Marrakesh, Morocco later this week; the one where the world’s nations are being asked to sign away their sovereignty, their freedoms and their identity in one of the most pernicious agreements ever devised by the UN: the justly infamous UN Global Compact for Migration. Lots of countries have already announced that they are not going to sign, among them the U.S., Hungary, Poland, Austria, Italy, Israel, Bulgaria, and Australia. There’s a clue as to how toxic this compact is: when even a country as emasculated and politically correct as Australia finds it too much to swallow.

Free trade

Times
Boris Johnson has said that the UK should keep half of its £39 billion divorce bill until the EU agrees a free trade deal that avoids a hard border in Ireland. The former foreign secretary claimed that Brussels would be prepared to renegotiate if faced with credible preparations for a no-deal exit in what he said amounted to a “sensible plan”. His comments yesterday were seen as a clear signal of an impending leadership bid
Mr Johnson said that as a way to further “incentivise” the EU the government should hold back on at least half the cash it has already agreed that it owes in budget contributions.

NHS

Mail
NHS trusts are flouting orders not to use tax avoidance schemes that cost the Treasury £140million a year, the Mail can reveal. Under the loophole, temporary staff are employed by financial consultants and supplied to hospitals as ‘medical services’. It means they are exempt from the 20 per cent VAT usually levied on agency workers. The consultancies providing the services are making huge sums from fees they charge hospitals they supply. Campaigners say the loss in public money from these schemes would be enough to fund 6,000 extra nurses a year.  The fees help bankroll a life of luxury for the firms’ bosses, with the founders of one company living in a mansion with pool and spa, racing sports cars at Silverstone and travelling by private jet for skiing trips.

Times
The NHS needs to perform an extra 10,000 operations a week to meet its target of stabilising waiting lists, a healthcare industry analysis says. The target was described as unrealistic, as hospitals prepared for what is likely to be a challenging few weeks. Last winter non-urgent operations were cancelled for weeks to free up theatre time for emergency cases. Hospital trusts have been told that their waiting lists for non-urgent treatment such as hip operations should be no longer next March than they were a year earlier, but that ambition looks unlikely to be met. In March this year there were 3.8 million patients on the list; in September there were 4.1 million.

Education

Mail
Hundreds of teachers are struggling with spelling, numeracy and the basics of their subjects, reports by school inspectors suggest.Analysis of Ofsted ratings shows many make mistakes during lessons or when marking work, leaving children confused. In some examples uncovered by the Mail, teachers were actually inserting errors into pupils’ work. Other cases involved teachers displaying ‘weak subject knowledge’ and offering ‘muddled and confusing explanations’. The findings show most mistakes are taking place at primaries, when children are learning the basics of core subjects such as English, maths and science. Campaigners say it suggests some teachers themselves are so poorly educated they are passing on their mistakes to youngsters. The findings come from analysis of 280 schools inspected by Ofsted over the past few years and graded ‘inadequate’ for teaching. At least 22 were identified as having teachers who lack basic literacy and numeracy skills, or knowledge of the curriculum. In one example from last year, inspectors at Dines Green Primary in Worcester found that ‘teachers make mistakes when teaching English and mathematics which leads to pupils becoming confused’.

Times
The 16 grammar schools that have won a share of the government’s £50 million expansion fund have some of the worst records of admitting disadvantaged pupils, according to an analysis by the House of Commons Library. The names of the successful schools, which will welcome thousands of extra pupils, were revealed last week. To qualify for the cash to expand they had to submit plans on how they would try to increase the proportion of poorer pupils. Labour said that figures on the schools’ admission of poor children cast doubt on whether they were really committed to diversifying their intake. They show that, on average, only 2 per cent of pupils at the 16 schools were eligible for free school meals.

Air travel

Mail
Airlines are routinely cancelling passengers’ return flights if they miss the first leg of the journey, a watchdog claims. The ‘rip-off’ practice can leave travellers thousands of pounds out of pocket, says Which?. So-called ‘no-show’ clauses are often buried in the terms and conditions when a ticket is purchased. They involve cancelling connecting or return flights if someone does not board the plane for their first flight – even if they have made an outward journey on a different flight. Typically no refund is given and seats can be re-sold, allowing airlines to double their money. Alex Neill of Which? said: ‘Missing a flight because you’re stuck in traffic or on a delayed train is frustrating enough, but for the airline to then turn around and say your return journey is cancelled as well is completely unfair and unjustified.

Rail travel

Mail
Rail passengers were this morning braced for fresh disruption following the launch of the latest new timetable. The last time major changes were made, in May, commuters were left stranded as thousands of services were delayed or cancelled. And although network bosses stressed they had planned fewer changes this time around, they warned there could still be ‘pockets of disruption’. Worst-hit in May were 8,000 Thameslink and Great Northern services – run by Govia Thameslink Railway – and 5,000 run by Northern, which were cancelled or severely delayed.  Both companies could face fines in the New Year following an investigation into whether they breached their operating licences.

Road travel

Mail
A new London pollution charge covering large swathes of London is expected to hit one million drivers and raise six times as much as the congestion charge. Mayor Sadiq Khan confirmed that ULEZ – being introduced in Central London next year – will stretch to cover an area surrounded by the North and South Circular roads from October 2021. The £12.50 per day fee means cash-strapped Transport for London will collect between £700 million and £1.5 billion every year- a significantly higher amount than the £230 million collected from the congestion charge. Gareth Bacon, leader of the Conservative group on the London Assembly, told The Times: ‘This could be Sadiq’s poll tax.

Mail
The number of drug-drivers caught on Britain’s roads has hit a record level, figures reveal today. In a nationwide police crackdown, an average of 37 motorists a day failed tests for banned substances. The figure represented more than half of those stopped by officers. 
Accidents involving drug-drivers also rose by more than 50 per cent compared with a similar operation last year. Alarmingly, police stopped fewer drivers in this year’s operation, but the rate at which motorists failed roadside tests for substances such as cannabis or cocaine increased.

Mail
Petrol prices fell 5p a litre last month – the biggest drop in nearly four years, the latest figures show. The average cost of unleaded is back to mid-May levels of about 130.61p a litre after dropping 5.18p in November, while diesel fell by 2.5p to 134.42p. This equates to a saving of £2.85 on a typical family-sized car’s tank of unleaded fuel. Oil prices have fallen by 24 per cent on the world market while, in the UK, supermarket price wars have also contributed to price cuts, said an RAC report. Petrol prices are still up to 10p a litre higher than they should be as not all the savings have yet been passed on to drivers. Simon Williams, of the RAC, said: ‘This should have translated to the average price of petrol being about 120p a litre but retailers chose not to pass on the savings, meaning the current average still remains unnecessarily high at 125.43p.

The post News review – Monday 10 December 2018 appeared first on UKIP Daily | UKIP News | UKIP Debate.

Saturday papers – 8 December 2018

Saturday papers – 8 December 2018

Theresa May

The Prime Minister is fighting for her political life, says the Telegraph.

Theresa May has been warned by Cabinet ministers she will have to quit if her Brexit deal is defeated in the Commons next week and she fails to secure better terms from the EU, the Telegraph can disclose.
Ministers believe that there is “zero” chance of her deal, which has been publicly criticised by more than 100 Tory MPs, passing in a crunch Commons vote on Tuesday.
One Cabinet minister told the Telegraph “she [Mrs May] will fall” if she is defeated and then fails to go back to Brussels to fundamentally renegotiate the EU withdrawal agreement.

The Times claims her efforts will come to nought.

Theresa May’s efforts to encourage Tory activists to bring her MPs into line have failed, a Conservative Home survey for The Times suggests.~The prime minister has held meetings and conference calls with activists and launched leaflet campaigns to convince the party to back her Brexit deal. A survey of 1,262 Tory members, taken on Thursday and yesterday, suggests that 72 per cent reject her deal and want their MP to do the same. Twenty-six per cent want their MP to accept the deal and 2 per cent are unsure.

The Times claims Labour MPs could team up with the Tories

MPs are lining up to sack Theresa May if her Brexit deal is rejected on Tuesday.
Labour is seeking to join forces with rebel Tories and the Democratic Unionist Party to bring the prime minister down by voting against her leadership.
Although the vote would not be binding it would place enormous pressure on Mrs May to resign. Conservative MPs reported “febrile” communications yesterday from those jockeying for position before a potential contest. Among those expected to run are Boris Johnson, Dominic Raab, Amber Rudd, Liz Truss, Sajid Javid, Jeremy Hunt and Michael Gove.

The Mail claims she is being warned.

The Prime Minister is being warned she will have to resign should her crunch Brexit vote end in disaster next week, it has emerged.
Several Cabinet ministers have warned her she is heading for a heavy defeat and urged her to seek fresh concessions from Brussels.
They fear if Mrs May goes ahead with Tuesday’s vote and loses by a large margin it will prove fatal for her leadership – and open the door to a softer ‘Norway-style’ Brexit.

And who might replace her? The Times speculates.

Boris Johnson has told allies to expect Theresa May to resign on Wednesday as leadership candidates scramble for position.
Tory MPs yesterday reported “febrile” communications from those jockeying for position ahead of a contest many now expect imminently.
Jeremy Hunt, the foreign secretary, is believed to be making a pitch as the candidate to deliver a “managed no-deal” exit. “He’s saying ‘you know what, no deal is not ideal but at the end of the day it would be fine’,” said a senior Tory on the right of the party.

Brexit

Meanwhile, elsewhere in the ongoing Brexit saga, a top Tory has taken apart the current offer, Westmonster reports.

Jacob Rees-Mogg has spent this afternoon underlining why he and vast majority of pro-Brexit MPs will vote down Theresa May’s deal.
Setting out his view over a series of six tweets, Mogg explain: “Reasons why the Withdrawal Agreement is bad 1/6: This deal hands over £39bn of UK taxpayers money with no guarantee of any long term agreement in return. In two years time we could be in the same place less £39bn. Our money should be conditional on a trade deal.
“This deal, Article 174, keeps the supremacy of the European Court over our own law.

The Independent says if MPs reject the deal we could be trapped in a permanent customs union.

Brexiters who reject Theresa May’s deal will drive the UK towards a permanent customs union with the EU, Downing Street has warned as the government tries to forestall a rash of resignations before next week’s historic vote.
The prime minister will spend the weekend at her country retreat of Chequers before embarking on what some at Westminster believe could be the closing act of her premiership.
With the parliamentary arithmetic looking bleak for the prospects of the deal being passed, she has been warned personally by several Brexit-backing government aides that they are prepared to resign on Tuesday unless there are major changes to her deal. Leavers are concerned the UK could be trapped indefinitely in the Irish backstop.

Northern Ireland

The Express turns its attention to Northern Ireland.

NORTHERN Ireland will be turned into a “separate country” under direct Brussels rule under Theresa May’s Brexit deal, a scathing report from a Eurosceptic group has warned.
Detailed analysis of the Prime Minister’s Withdrawal Agreement and legal advice to the Government showed the province would remain subject to more than 300 EU laws after Brexit, according to the report from Lawyers for Britain. It also condemned the backstop border protection mechanism as a “complete capitulation” to the EU’s demands. The report, written by leading lawyer Martin Howard QC, said Northern Ireland would effectively be ruled by a “foreign power” after Brexit under the Prime Minister’s deal.

Plan B

A cabinet minister has suggested a Norway-style agreement should be considered, says the Mail.

Amber Rudd has become the first Cabinet minster to suggest that a Norway-style Brexit is a suitable ‘Plan B’ to the Prime Minister’s deal.
Under the Norway-plus plan, the UK would remain in the single market and customs union, which would remove the need to use the Irish backstop provision.
In an interview with The Times, the Work and Pensions Secretary said a Norway-style arrangement ‘seems plausible not just in terms of the country but in terms of where the MPs are’. 

The Sun also reports the prospect.

AMBER Rudd last night declared Britain should join an EU halfway house if Theresa May’s Brexit deal falls – as the PM was warned the Conservative Party could next week split up.
The Work and Pensions Secretary defied No10 to become the first Cabinet minister to openly discuss a Plan B to the PM’s troubled agreement with the EU.
In an interview with The Times, Ms Rudd said membership of the European Economic Area (EEA) “seems plausible as an alternative, for the country but where MPs are too”.

Second referendum

Plans for another referendum are under discussion, says the Independent.

A major row has broken out between supporters of a Final SayBrexit referendum, over a Liberal Democrat push for a vote next week.
Vince Cable’s party tabled an amendment to next week’s crucial Commons vote on Theresa May’s withdrawal deal, which would approve it – subject to a fresh public vote.
But the move was quickly denounced by the People’s Vote campaign as “deeply unhelpful”, because it will come too soon to have any realistic hope of success.

LEAVE campaigners are quietly getting ready for another Brexit referendum, if Theresa May’s deal is rejected, it’s been reported.
MPs and activists are said to be making preparations for another referendum in case Parliament forces a second vote on the country.
Sources told the Financial Times that an aide to political strategist Lynton Crosby, the mastermind behind some of the Tories election victories, has been talking to Eurosceptic MPs about plotting the future of Brexit.

A campaigning group is also planning along the same lines, says BBC News.

The head of a pro-Brexit campaign has said it is preparing for another EU referendum.
Richard Tice, of Leave Means Leave, said he could see Theresa May calling such a vote “within a fortnight”.
“We think it is 50/50 that it will happen”, he told the BBC’s Politics Live, but his campaign had hired office space and was raising funds.
He said the campaign’s “core message” would be that the PM’s Brexit deal is a “total betrayal of trust in democracy”.

The Guardian considers whether the Labour Party would support a second referendum.

John McDonnell has rejected warnings from Len McCluskey, the Unite leader, that Labour members would see support for a second Brexit referendum as a betrayal, adding that in a choice between Theresa May’s deal and staying in the EU he would vote remain.
McCluskey, who wields substantial influence in the party, told a group of Labour Mps this week that they could alienate supporters by backing a fresh referendum, and urged them to stick to Labour’s alternative Brexit plan.

Labour Party

Sky News claims Labour is trying to team up with the DUP.

Jeremy Corbyn has reached out to the DUP and said that Labour is “ready to step in and negotiate seriously” to find an alternative Brexit deal with the EU.
In an exclusive interview with Sky News, the Labour Party leader said the DUP “dislike the backstop for very good and sensible reasons” and that “absolutely” Labour’s version of Brexit can work for the Northern Ireland party and the people of the province.
He also said he wanted to find a “serious alternative” to the deal proposed by Prime Minister Theresa May. 

And Reuters claims the Labour Party accepts the possibility of a second referendum in Scotland,

Britain’s opposition Labour party does not rule out allowing another Scottish independence referendum should it be voted into power, its finance spokesman said on Friday, although he saw the issue as a distraction given Britain’s current problems.
John McDonnell said a British Labour government would consider whether to grant permission for a Scottish referendum if backed by the devolved parliament should the case arise, even though it opposes Scotland splitting from the United Kingdom.

Project Fear

You think there have been dire warnings about going to WTO rules? You ain’t seen nothing yet! The Express reports:

MINISTERS have been accused of a fresh “Project Fear” propaganda blitz after the Government warned a no deal Brexit could cause six months of chaos on key cross-Channel routes.
Ferries between Dover and Calais and traffic using the Channel Tunnel could be disrupted until the end of September 2019, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said. He made the forecast in a letter to the NHS and the pharmaceutical industry today.

The Telegraph reports more warnings.

Warnings of a “logjam” at Britain’s ports as a result of a no-deal Brexit are misleading, a senior representative of the industry has said.
It comes after Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, said that ports would face chaos if the UK left the EU without a deal and would take “years” to adapt.
But Tim Morris, the chief executive of UK Major Ports Group, the trade body, said: “The UK’s port sector is a resilient, adaptable and highly competitive one, offering customers a range of options.

The Times claims there’ll be disruption.

A disruptive no-deal Brexit could lead to six months of chaos at the borders, the government has warned.
If Britain left the European Union without a deal in March, ferry services between Dover and Calais and traffic using the Channel Tunnel would face severe disruption until the end of September, it said.
The warning was included in a letter sent by Matt Hancock, the health secretary, to the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS yesterday.

And the Independent gleefully reports on the possible scenarios.

A no-deal Brexit could see charter planes used to fly in drugs to prop up the NHS and medicines given priority access through gridlocked ports, health secretary Matt Hancock has said.
The minister also revealed the government was consulting on plans for chemists to ration medication so that patients can retain access to vital treatments in the event of shortages caused by the UK’s withdrawal.
His remarks come as embattled prime minister Theresa May was criticised by backbench Tory rebels and the DUP over her “desperate” comprise efforts to attract support for her beleaguered deal.

Fisheries

Boris has turned his attention to our fishing industry, says Breitbart.

Tory arch-Brexiteer Boris Johnson has warned that Theresa May’s “worst deal in history” with the European Union will empower Brussels to “bully and blackmail” Britain over fisheries, where EU control has already resulted in tens of thousands of job losses.
Writing in the
Press and Journal newspaper which serves much of northern Scotland and in particular the “Granite City” of Aberdeen which boomed during Britain’s North Sea oil rush, the former Foreign and Commonwealth Secretary warned that the EU’s hated Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) will be “reinvented” during the transition period negotiations envisaged by May’s deal, with Brussels “effectively holding all the cards”.

Westmonster also reports on fish.

Boris Johnson has warned that British fishermen will be sold out under Theresa May’s plan, laying out how the EU will not stop until has “worked out a way to plunder the waters of Scotland for their fish”.
Writing for the Scottish regional the Press and Journal, he set out how the plan would give the EU “infinite power to bully and blackmail” to ensure Brussels “get whatever it wants in the future negotiations”.
That would include French President Macron, who has already issued a threat when it comes to the Britain’s fisheries, refusing to “let Britain out of jail until we have satisfied his demands for UK fish”.

UKIP

Our party is in the news. The Independent reports:

More senior figures have left Ukip as the party continues to implode in a row over its association with far-right activist Tommy Robinson.
David Coburn, Ukip’s long-serving Scottish leader, quit on Friday morning, accusing the party of promoting “English nationalism” and anti-Islamic politics.
He was closely followed to the exit door by former leader Paul Nuttall, who said dealing with Mr Robinson was a “catastrophic error”.

The Guardian claims the party is in turmoil.

The resignation of three MEPs from Ukip over the appointment of the far-right campaigner Tommy Robinson as adviser has plunged the party into turmoil, forcing its leader to pull out of his European party group.
The leader, Gerard Batten, announced his resignation from the Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy group (EFDD) after an exodus of senior figures from the party, including the EFDD president, Nigel Farage.
Batten said he could not remain in the EFDD while Farage launched “continual attacks on me and Ukip in the UK media”.

The Express claims it’s a blow for the party.

NIGEL Farage’s party UKIP, which changed the entire landscape of British politics and help force Britain’s exit from Europe, was today dealt a further body blow as MEP and former leader Paul Nuttall quit.
Mr Nuttall became the latest leading figure in the party to announce his resignation in protest at the decision to appoint Tommy Robinson as an adviser. In a statement, Mr Nuttall, the MEP for North West England, said: “After much soul-searching over the past week, I have concluded that I must, as of today, resign as a member of Ukip. I do this with an immense amount of reluctance and regret, as I have worked tirelessly for the party for the past fourteen years.

And the Sun says:

FAR-right activist Tommy Robinson has sparked a Ukip exodus as ex-leader Paul Nuttall has walked out – just days after Nigel Farage quit.
Ukip MEP Paul Nuttall this morning became the latest leading figure in the party to announce his resignation in protest at the decision to appoint Tommy Robinson as an adviser.
Mr Nuttall said: “I am resigning because the party is being taken in a direction which I believe is harmful to Brexit. The association with Tommy Robinson will simply appall many moderate Brexit voters and inevitably be detrimental to the cause.

Sunday’s rally

The Morning Star claims the march and rally planned for Sunday will be challenged.

THOUSANDS of anti-racism activists will march in central London on Sunday in a counter-demonstration against fascist thugs.
As former English Defence League leader “Tommy Robinson” – real name Stephen Yaxley-Lennon – and Ukip attempt to “capitalise” on the Brexit crisis through a “Brexit Betrayal” march, a major counter-protest will be held in the hope of stopping them in their tracks.
The counter-demonstration is supported by a wide cross-section of anti-racist groups, trade unions, women’s, LGBT+, Muslim, Jewish and other faith and community groups.

Christmas travel

If you’re thinking of getting away for Christmas, keep an eye on the media, because there could be trouble. The Telegraph says:

Rail and airline passengers will face travel misery this Christmas as two major strikes were announced for the same day.

Pilots from Virgin Atlantic and members of the RMT union on South Western Railway are expected to walk out on December 22 in separate disputes.
The action threatens to cause maximum disruption on one of the final – and busiest – shopping days before the festive break, as well as frustrating getaway plans.

The Star reports on the airlines.

A GROUP of Virgin Atlantic pilots are set to strike over Christmas and the New Year – sparking fears of major travel disruption.
“Our door is – and has always been – open to Virgin to take the necessary steps to prevent any disruption for Christmas travellers. This is such an easy fix for the company; by including all unions in negotiations – not just one selected by the company – it can then live up to its claimed inclusiveness and we can get round the table together to negotiate a sustainable outcome for our members.

Plague

But we could all be wiped out anyway, says the Star.

AN ancient plague strain discovered in a 5,000-year-old tomb in Sweden may have caused the first major global pandemic in human history, scientists believe.
Researchers found the previously unknown strain of plague when excavating a limestone tomb in Frälsegården, Sweden, dated to around 2,000BC.
Analysis of the notorious bacterium, known as Yersinia pestis, indicates the deadly germ may have devastated settlements across Europe at the end of the Stone Age.

The post Saturday papers – 8 December 2018 appeared first on UKIP Daily | UKIP News | UKIP Debate.

Remainers welcome ECJ expert’s view that UK can abandon Brexit

European court of justice’s advocate general says article 50 can be revoked without needing permission of all EU members

Remain campaigners have hailed a European legal opinion that the UK can unilaterally abandon Brexit, saying it greatly boosts their efforts to stop the process of exiting the EU.

A senior legal adviser to the European court of justice (ECJ), Campos Sánchez-Bordona, told the court on Tuesday he believed the UK could revoke article 50 independently, without needing the permission of every other EU member state.

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