Posts Tagged ‘parliament’

SNAKES in the GRASS.

SNAKES in the GRASS.

 

 

Last Tuesday (4th December) I was a man on a mission.

Taking advantage of the privilege granted to former Members of Parliament I positioned myself in the East gallery of the chamber of the House of Commons, directly opposite the despatch box from which the Prime Minister would make the opening speech in the scheduled five day debate on the ‘EU Withdrawal Agreement’ (WA) that she had brought back from that temple of freedom and democracy in Brussels.

Albeit totally against the rules, my plan was to stand up and, looking the Prime Minister straight in the eye, accuse her of having defied the freely expressed will of the people by failing to deliver a proper Brexit and of having thereby also betrayed the people’s trust in the democratic process.

Had I not then been hauled down by a burly doorkeeper I would have gone on to say that Theresa May should GO…..and GO QUICKLY……taking her mendacity and her perfidy with her!

I was hell-bent on making my protest because my democratically expressed opinion – an opinion shared by the 17.4 million other people who, on 23rd June 2016, voted to Leave the sclerotic and totalitarian European Union – was being cast aside in favour of Mrs May’s abject capitulation to the EU, the so-called WA.

When I went to the House at midday the situation, in simple terms, was that if her WA was defeated in the vote next Tuesday (11th December) we would have then been on course to leave the EU on 29th March 2019 with no strings attached……..and saving our country a King’s ransom (£39 Billions) into the bargain !

Defeat of the WA would have meant that, with one bound, we would at last have been on track to resume our former status as a free, independent and democratic nation…….but the arch-Remainers on the Conservative benches, all 25 of them, had other plans.

Notwithstanding that the Conservative Party manifesto, on which they had all stood at the superfluous General Election last year, pledged a Conservative government to implement the decision of the people’s vote in the 2016 Referendum, they wanted and connived at something entirely contrary.

As a result of the fiendishly clever amendment moved by former Attorney General, Dominic Grieve (Beaconsfield MP) and whole-heartedly supported by dyed-in-the-wool europhile Father of the House, Ken Clarke (Rushcliffe MP), we’re into uncharted waters.

Theresa May’s WA is not amendable, but now, supposing it is voted down on Tuesday (which on Monday appeared to be almost a racing certainty ) whatever motion she might bring back to the House in its place will be subject to whatever amendment her wrecker colleagues in the House of Commons choose to make.

All very democratic you might think, until you realise that what this is all about is a last-ditch attempt to overturn the Referendum decision and to prevent us ever leaving the benighted EU.

Heads the Remainers win, tails the Leavers lose !

Rather than face the prospect of something infinitely worse, tabled by MP Remainers  in the event that the PM loses the vote on Tuesday, MP Leavers will now be under inordinate pressure to bury their principles, grit their teeth, and vote for the appalling WA, despite knowing full-well that such action will effectively negate the majority Referendum decision !

This all begs the question as to where we Leavers go from here.

My one-man protest in the House on Tuesday was occasioned by sheer frustration that having fought this EU battle – responsibly utilising the democratic means at my disposal, both as a voter and from 1987 to 2001, as a Member of Parliament – and having eventually won the battle of hearts and minds it now appears that I and others like me might, in reality, have lost !

The Prime Minister takes the view that to accommodate the views of both the Remainers and the Leavers it is her duty to find a compromise to settle the issue.

NO, Prime Minister, that is not how our constitution works !

In British ‘first past the post’ elections, the winner takes all.

By your compromises you are opening the door ever wider to a Corbyn administration and if you believe that he is going to compromise to accommodate the views of defeated conservatives then you really do need to think again !

You’ve lost the plot, you’ve lost control of your Party and, unforgivably, you are on the cusp of selling us out to the EU.

Nobody doubts your capacity for hard work, your exceptional stamina and your sheer determination but, for the sake of our great nation, please do as I tried to tell you on Tuesday.

Just GO and make way for someone who will deliver what the people voted for.

 

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News review – Thursday 6 December 2018

News review – Thursday 6 December 2018

Brexit

Times
Cabinet ministers are urging Theresa May to delay next Tuesday’s crucial Brexit vote amid fears that she is facing a defeat so catastrophic that it could bring down the government. Gavin Williamson, the defence secretary, is understood to be trying to persuade the prime minister to postpone the vote, which it is thought she could lose by 100 MPs or more. Others, including Amber Rudd, the work and pensions secretary, Sajid Javid, the home secretary, and Alun Cairns, the Welsh secretary, say that she should continue to sell the Brexit deal but call off the vote on Monday if she is still facing defeat by more than 70.

Mail
Ministers are urging Theresa May to delay next week’s crunch Brexit vote – as the EU prepares to offer her the option of postponing Brexit beyond March. The Prime Minister is considering a range of measures designed to make the Irish ‘backstop’ more palatable to her mutinous backbenchers. Proposals include placing a parliamentary ‘lock’ on the backstop, which would give MPs the final say over whether to enter an arrangement which critics fear could keep the UK trapped in the customs union indefinitely.  Downing Street is also considering a new law that would guarantee there could be no divergence of rules between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK during any backstop period.

Sun
THERESA May has been urged to POSTPONE next week’s crucial Brexit vote, with Cabinet ministers warning defeat could collapse the Government. It comes as EU leaders suggest the leave date could be pushed back beyond March if she loses. At least three Cabinet ministers are believed to be trying to persuade the PM to put the December 11 vote off. Labour plans to issue a vote of no confidence if May loses. According to the Daily Mail, one said: “We need to be creative and we need to get the DUP back on board. It can be done, but it can’t be done before next Tuesday.” Another said: “Marching people into the valley of death next Tuesday is a mistake.”

Soft Brexit

Express
TORY officials have hinted at the prospect pushing through plans for a soft Brexit that will see the UK trapped in the customs union and single market. Theresa May is facing a huge battle to get her deal through parliament and now sources say there is enough cross-party support for an alternative to the Prime Minister’s withdrawal agreement from the EU. Former Downing Street fixer Sir Oliver Letwin told the Evening Standard: “I do believe there is a cross-party majority for that solution in the House of Commons.” Whilst Nicky Morgan added: “It has been clear for months now that a consensus in Parliament can be found around access to the single market and being part of a customs union, which points towards a Norway-plus solution.”

Times
A group of Labour and Tory MPs are attempting to take control of the Brexit process if Theresa May’s deal is voted down next week. The move would be likely to result in a softer version of Brexit, with senior Conservatives claiming that there is a Commons majority for a permanent Norway-style customs deal. With the prime minister widely expected in Westminster to lose the vote on her deal on Tuesday, rival camps are jostling to be in position when she is forced to scramble together a Plan B. Cabinet ministers have begun discussing the idea of cross-party co-operation in the hope of bouncing Mrs May into accepting a softer Brexit deal next week.

Theresa May

Independent
Theresa May has been accused of “inadvertently misleading” parliament over Brexit in an angry prime minister’s questions clash, as the government
was forced to publish the full legal advice on her deal. Her administration became the first in modern political history to be found in contempt of parliament over its refusal to hand over the advice on a bruising day in the Commons, where Ms May suffered three significant defeats. SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford said the advice had to “dragged out” of ministers and claimed Ms May had been misleading MPs, before he was rebuked by the Speaker.

Sun
THERESA May was accused of lying to Parliament yesterday as documents proved her deal risks splitting Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK “indefinitely”. Furious DUP MPs blasted the PM for “stabbing us in the back” as full legal advice from the Attorney General was revealed. It showed Britain will have to be treated as a “third country” by the province under the post-Brexit backstop. The DUP said confirmation that checks would be needed on goods crossing to and from Great Britain made a mockery of the PM’s vow to never accept a virtual border down the Irish Sea.

Express
THERESA May is desperately trying to win over Tory Brexit rebels with an offer of a parliamentary veto on the most controversial part of her Brussels deal. In a series of private meetings with backbenchers, the Prime Minister suggested MPs could get a vote before the UK is allowed to enter the so-called Northern Ireland “backstop” which could keep the country tied into a customs union with the EU. Ministers were understood to be planning an amendment to the motion for next week’s crunch Commons vote on the deal to introduce the extra “parliamentary lock” on entering the backstop. Her offer was put forward on Tuesday following intensifying fears that her deal will be rejected by a margin of more than 100 MPs at Westminster on Tuesday.

Mail
Theresa May is making a desperate bid to buy off her Tory rebels by holding talks on giving Parliament a veto on entering into the controversial Irish backstop. The PM is facing overwhelming opposition to her divorce deal, which is widely expected to be voted down by MPs in next week’s crunch vote. But with just six days until the crucial vote, the PM is scrambling to try to broker a new compromise to pick off Brexit rebels threatening to derail her deal. Number Ten is discussing a plan to give MPs a vote at a later date on whether the UK enters the backstop or wants to tear up the entire Brexit deal altogether.

Guardian
Theresa May has stepped up last-ditch efforts to try to win over Brexit-backing MPs after government legal advice warned the Irish backstop could leave the UK trapped in “protracted and repeated rounds of negotiations” for years to come. But Brexiters immediately rejected one idea mooted by Downing Street, of promising a “parliamentary lock” – giving MPs a vote before the backstop could be implemented. The prime minister is holding a series of face-to-face meetings with groups of MPs, seeking to persuade them there is no viable alternative to her approach. With just six days to go until the vote on her controversial deal, which May is expected to lose heavily,

Art50

Sky News
The government will not need to pass legislation in order to revoke Article 50 if the European Court of Justice (ECJ) confirm an initial opinion reached earlier today in Luxembourg, according to Sky sources. The Wightman case – referred by the Court of Session, the highest court in Scotland – was heard by the ECJ last week and one of its top legal officers – the advocate general Campos Sanchez-Bordona –
has announced that the UK has the right to withdraw the clause and stay in the EU before its planned departure on 29 March. Sky News understands from senior government sources that – in pure legal terms – no legislation needs to be passed in order for any hypothetical revocation to take place.

DUP

Telegraph
The DUP has assured Brexiteers it will not bring down the Government if they reject Theresa May’s Brexit deal next week.  Nigel Dodds, the DUP Westminster leader, told a meeting of Tory Brexiteers on Wednesday night that his party would support the Government in a confidence vote if the draft withdrawal agreement is thrown out by Parliament next week. However, it will withdraw its support if Mrs May’s deal goes through – wiping out her working majority in Parliament and raising the spectre of a general election. Mr Dodds warned the Prime Minister that there would be “implications” if her deal “squeaks” through Parliament next week. 

ITV News
DUP Westminster leader Nigel Dodds has indicated that his party would bring Theresa May’s government down if the Prime Minister got her Brexit deal through the House of Commons. DUP support for Mrs May’s administration in any confidence motion would depend on the deal being defeated or ditched by the Prime Minister. Mr Dodds told ITV’s Peston the DUP would not be voting for Mrs May’s Withdrawal Agreement “as things stand”, adding he could not see “much being changed that will be effective” before the meaningful vote on December 11.

Mail
The DUP have threatened to pull their support for Theresa May and send her premiership crashing down if her Brexit deal is passed next week. The party – who are propping the Tories up in No 10 in a confidence and supply deal – are furious at the Brexit deal and demanded the PM go back to the negotiating table.  The have promised to back the PM in a confidence vote if the Brexit deal is rejected by the Commons next Tuesday.  But they have effectively warned that they will not if her Brexit deal is passed by MPs next Tuesday. 

Labour Party

Guardian
The Unite general secretary, Len McCluskey, has privately told Labour MPs the party should have severe reservations about backing a fresh Brexit referendum, saying voters could see it as a betrayal. The deep scepticism from one of Jeremy Corbyn’s closest and most powerful supporters is likely to unnerve MPs and campaigners hoping the party is warming to the idea of a fresh Brexit vote. Labour’s deputy leader, Tom Watson, hit back at McCluskey’s warning, laying bare the tensions in the party. “To suggest it represents a ‘betrayal’ grossly distorts Labour’s position and is deeply unhelpful to those seeking a solution to an an issue that is reaching crisis proportions,” he told the Guardian.

Express
JEREMY Corbyn was mocked for failing to grill Theresa May on Brexit after she suffered three successive, humiliating defeats in just over an hour yesterday. The Labour leader was expected to quiz the Prime Minister over her decision to withhold the Attorney General’s Brexit legal advice, which she was forced to publish after the Commons voted to hold the Government in contempt of Parliament, but failed to press her on the issue. Yesterday’s historic Parliamentary session left Mrs May as the first Prime Minister to be defeated three times in one day for more than 40 years and she will stand at the despatch box today fighting not just to save her deal, which looks doomed to fail, but her whole government too.

Brexit betrayal rally

Independent
Ukip and former English Defence League leader Tommy Robinson are staging a “Brexit Betrayal Rally” in London on Sunday 9 December. An opportunity for Brexiteers dissatisfied with prime minister Theresa May’s deal for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU to express their anger, the march is expected to attract thousands of Leave voters to the streets of the capital, many travelling long distances by coach to attend. The demonstration has been scheduled ahead of the “meaningful” parliamentary vote on Tuesday, in which members of the House of Commons will decide whether or not to accept the deal.

EU

Times
There could scarcely be a less auspicious time for Britain to return to Brussels and seek to restart the Brexit negotiations in the hope of a more attractive deal. With rioting on the streets of French cities, a looming stand-off over Italy’s debt and a weakened Angela Merkel preparing to cede control of her party, the European Union has neither the time nor the inclination to revisit the Irish border question. In crude terms, Europe’s problems stem from much the same source as Brexit: popular anger at liberal immigration policies, the rising cost of living and a political class that is struggling to sustain its democratic legitimacy.

NHS

Telegraph
Foreign hackers have attempted to access the genetic blueprints of thousands of NHS patients, officials have said as they revealed the data is being guarded at a high-security military base. Leaders of Genomics England said they had fought off multiple cyber attacks on a flagship project to map the genes of a million people. The new service aims to transform the chances of patients with cancer and rare diseases by comparing their genomes – the complete set of genetic material – against a growing library of others. It will enable doctors to better predict what treatments will work, and should increasingly allow patients to assess their chance of future disease and help them avoid it altogether.

Mail
Foreign hackers have made multiple attempts to steal the genetic details of thousands of NHS patients that are being guarded at a top-security military base. Officials overseeing the Genomics England project hope to map the genes of more than a million NHS patients so they can be informed if they have any rare diseases. They revealed the project had successfully fended off a number of well-documented cyber-attacks including some ‘from overseas’. Experts say it could be used to identify individual patients and potentially even blackmail them by exposing their sensitive health conditions health conditions.

Climate change

Telegraph
Climate change made this year’s summer heatwave around 30 times more likely than it would be under natural conditions, the Met Office has said. This summer was the equal warmest in a series dating back to 1910, along with 2006, 2003 and 1976, with temperatures reaching a peak on July 27 when 35.6C (96F) was recorded at Felsham, Suffolk. New analysis from the Met Office has found that the record-breaking summer temperatures were about 30 times more likely as a result of climate change caused by human activities.

Mail
Climate change made this year’s summer heatwave around 30 times more likely than it would be under natural conditions, the Met Office has said. This year’s scorching summer was joint warmest overall with 2006, 2003, and 1976 – and its highest temperature hit 35.6C in Suffolk. New analysis from the Met Office has found that the record-breaking summer temperatures were about 30 times more likely as a result of climate change caused by human activities. The UK now has around a 12 per cent chance of summer average temperatures being as high as they were in 2018 every year.

Star
GREENLAND’S melting is “off the charts” because of climate change and scientists are terrified it is about to go into “overdrive”, according to a shock study. The melting of Greenland’s ice sheet has accelerated to unprecedented rates because of rising temperatures, analysis of ice cores has found. Scientist found that increases in melting closely follow the start of industrial-era warming in the Arctic in the mid-1800s but the magnitude of the melt has exceeded natural variability in the past few decades.

Migration pact

Westmonster
A petition calling on the UK government to reject the United Nations’ controversial global Migration Compact has exceeded the 100,000 signatures necessary for it to be debated in Parliament. The petition, which has been promoted by Leave.EU among others, has gathered considerable pace in the last fortnight but is yet to receive a response from the government after surpassing 10,000 signatories 11 days ago. The United States and Australia, in addition to a multitude of European nations have confirmed they will not be agreeing to the compact which aims to confirm migration as a human right, conflating legal and illegal migration.

Technology

Mail
Huawei’s equipment is to be removed from the core of BT’s existing 3G and 4G mobile networks and would not use the Chinese company in next generation 5G. The chief of Britain’s foreign intelligence services MI6 said this week that reliance on Chinese technology for 5G was something Britain needed to discuss.  New Zealand and Australia have stopped telecom operators using Huawei’s equipment in new 5G networks because they are concerned about possible Chinese government involvement in their communications infrastructure. Chinese firm Huawei, the world’s biggest network equipment maker ahead of Ericsson and Nokia, has said Beijing has no influence over its operations.

France

Times
President Macron beat a retreat for the second time in two days as farmers, lorry drivers and students joined the tax revolt that is threatening to derail his presidency. After announcing a six-month freeze on fuel duties on Tuesday in an attempt to appease popular anger, Mr Macron backtracked again last night and scrapped next year’s rises altogether. The climbdown was a further humiliation for his government, which had repeatedly ruled out abandoning the planned fuel tax rises which prompted the yellow-vest movement.

Sun
HORRIFIC video of police attacking defenceless protestors during the Paris riots has emerged in France. The shocking images are the latest evidence of Republican Security Companies (CRS) acting with immense brutality. They show so-called Yellow Vest fuel price demonstrators caught inside a Burger King fast food restaurant in Avenue Wagram, close to the Arc de Triomphe, last Saturday. The men and women – who take their name from the high visibility jackets all motorists have to carry in France – cover their heads with their hands as blows rain down.

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News review – Tuesday 4 December 2018

News review – Tuesday 4 December 2018

Theresa May

Express
THERESA MAY has been accused of holding secret weekly Brexit meetings with Cabinet ministers and civil servants of which no record has been made, sparking accusations of a “scandal”. Political advisers to the Government are said to be increasingly concerned about the meetings. Mrs May’s Government has relied upon various subcommittees to deal with Brexit since Article 50 was triggered in March 2017. But since the controversial Chequers summit this summer the Prime Minister has held weekly off-the-books meetings with her core advisers and ministers, often with civil servants present.

Sky News
Theresa May will kick off the biggest gamble of her political life as she fights to persuade MPs to back her Brexit deal. Facing down Labour, Conservative and DUP critics, the prime minister will insist the House of Commons must vote for her agreement to “respect the decision of the British people”. Mrs May is due to kick off a marathon five-day debate on the terms of Brexit, culminating in a series of dramatic votes next Tuesday. The fate of those will determine if her Brexit deal succeeds, whether the UK could be headed for no deal, a second referendum, or even a general election. But first MPs will vote today on whether to hold ministers in “contempt of parliament” for refusing to publish the full legal advice given to the government on its Brexit deal.

Sun
‘DEFEATED’ Theresa May will tomorrow implore all MPs to back her Brexit deal even as senior ministers last night gave up any final hope of victory. The PM fires the starting gun to the biggest Parliament showdown in decades when she opens a marathon five day debate in the Commons on the ‘meaningful vote’. She will insist that her controversial EU exit agreement “delivers for the British people” before MPs decide on it a week today, on December 11. But one normally loyal Tory MP who had a private audience with the PM yesterday told The Sun that she “looked defeated”. And ministers were also last night resigned to a crushing government defeat after almost 100 Tory MPs spoke out against the deal.

Legal advice

Guardian
The UK is “indefinitely committed” to the Irish backstop if it comes into force, the attorney general, Geoffrey Cox, has told MPs as he explained to them the legal advice he gave the government on the planned Brexit deal. Answering questions from MPs in what Downing Street said was the first such appearance by an attorney general in the Commons in decades, Cox also said there was no unilateral right for the UK to pull out of the backstop, which would come into force to prevent a hard Irish border if no permanent trade deal was reached. “Let me make no bones about the Northern Ireland protocol. It will subsist, we are indefinitely committed to it if it came into force,” Cox said.

Times
The backstop plan to avoid a hard Irish border is an uncomfortable necessity, Theresa May’s chief Brexit negotiator has insisted, after a leaked letter revealed that he had told the prime minister that it would be a “bad outcome” for Britain. Olly Robbins told MPs that the backstop proposal, which is opposed by many Conservative MPs because Britain cannot cancel it unilaterally, was the only way to guarantee a Brexit deal. “I think the backstop is not the future relationship that either the UK or the EU wants to have with one another,” he told the Brexit select committee. “It is an uncomfortable position for both sides and the reality . . . is that there is not a withdrawal agreement without a backstop.

Telegraph
Commons Speaker John Bercow has told MPs he believes there is an “arguable case that a contempt has been committed” by the Government over its failure to publish its Brexit legal advice in full. The move came after the DUP, Labour, SNP, Liberal Democrats, Greens and Plaid Cymru wrote to Mr Bercow demanding the triggering of contempt proceedings, which could lead to sanctions against ministers including the Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox, who had earlier told MPs that Britain will be “indefinitely committed” to the customs backstop with the EU if it comes into force. Mr Cox told his critics in the Commons it was time they “grew up and got real” over the legal advice.

Mail
Attorney General Geoffrey Cox admitted tonight the UK cannot unilaterally exit the Irish border backstop – prompting claims the Brexit divorce is a ‘trap’. Mr Cox told MPs if the backstop ever comes into force there will have to be a trade deal or proof the EU is acting in bad faith to escape it. To heckles of ‘it’s a trap’, Mr Cox told MPs the Brexit divorce deal contained ‘no unilateral right for either party to terminate’. Insisting he would answer questions ‘candidly’, Mr Cox said the Britain was ‘indefinitely committed’ to the backstop if it ever came into force – but said that was a political not a legal question.

Mirror
Labour is leading calls for the government to face contempt of Parliament proceedings over their refusal to publish their Brexit legal advice. MPs passed a motion two weeks ago that ordered ministers to provide “any legal advice in full” on Theresa May’s deal. At the time, Commons Speaker John Bercow confirmed the motion should take effect adding: “It is not just an expression of opinion”. But the government insist they will only publish a “summary” of the legal advice. Today, a cross-party alliance has written to Speaker John Bercow, asking him to consider launching contempt proceedings against the Government for failing to release the Attorney General’s full legal advice on the Brexit deal as ordered by Parliament.

Times
Ministers face being held in contempt of parliament today after refusing to publish the attorney-general’s legal advice on Theresa May’s Brexit deal. John Bercow, the Speaker, announced last night that he would accept a motion of contempt against the government for failing to comply with a Commons order to publish the advice. The motion, which will be debated today, could result in Geoffrey Cox, the attorney-general, or David Liddington, Mrs May’s de facto deputy, being suspended from parliament. “I have considered the matter carefully and I am satisfied that there is an arguable case that a contempt has been committed,” Mr Bercow told MPs.

Sky News
The government may have broken parliamentary rules by failing to fully release legal advice over the Brexit deal, according to John Bercow. The House of Commons Speaker announced MPs would get a chance to debate and vote on the matter first thing on Tuesday. The repercussions of an MP being found in contempt can include them being suspended or expelled from parliament. It came in response to a letter from six political parties, including Labour and minority government partners the DUP. They are fighting the government’s chief legal adviser’s decision to publish just a summary of legal advice on the Brexit divorce deal.

ITV News
A legal opinion on whether the UK can unilaterally revoke its withdrawal from the EU will be published later. An advocate general from the European Court of Justice (ECJ) will produce his opinion on the case, brought by a cross-party group of Scottish politicians, ahead of a judgment by the court at a later date. Manuel Campos Sanchez-Bordona’s written opinion will be an independent legal solution to the question of whether an EU member state such as the UK can decide on its own to revoke the Article 50 withdrawal process or whether the agreement of the 27 other member states would be required.

Westmonster
The UK government have released some legal advice that confirms the EU ‘backstop’ trap position would continue to apply indefinitely until a deal is done. By then of course Brussels will have banked Britain’s £39 billion long ago.
The paragraph on the Irish backstop in the legal advice makes clear: “The main provisions of the Protocol come into force from the end of the implementation period (31 December 2020 – see Article 185 of the Agreement) in the event that a subsequent agreement is not in place by then, and the Protocol will continue to apply unless and until it is superseded, in whole in or part, by a subsequent agreement establishing alternative arrangements (Article 1(4), and the fifth recital in the preamble).

BBC News
MPs will vote later on whether the UK government broke Parliament’s rules by failing to publish the full legal advice it received on the Brexit plan. The government’s chief legal adviser, Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, published an overview on Monday. Opposition parties say that by limiting the information released, ministers ignored a binding Commons vote demanding they release the full advice. No 10 insists publishing confidential advice is not in the national interest. It comes ahead of five days of debate on the EU withdrawal agreement, with MPs voting on the PM’s deal next week.

Guardian
A senior minister is at risk of being suspended from the House of Commons after Labour and the Democratic Unionist party were allowed to submit an emergency motion accusing the government of holding parliament in contempt for failing to publish the full Brexit legal advice. John Bercow, the Speaker, allowed Labour, the DUP and four other opposition parties to lay down a motion that will be voted on on Tuesday, immediately before before the start of the five-day debate on the Brexit deal. The motion, submitted late on Monday, calls on MPs to find “ministers in contempt for their failure to comply” and is signed by the shadow Brexit secretary, Sir Keir Starmer; the DUP’s Westminster leader, Nigel Dodds; and the Scottish National party, Liberal Democrats, Plaid Cymru and the Green party.

Mail
Commons Speaker John Bercow has told MPs that he believes there is an ‘arguable case that a contempt has been committed’ by the Government over Brexit legal advice. Mr Bercow gave the ruling after representations from Labour, the DUP and four other opposition parties that ministers were in contempt of Parliament for failing to publish the full Brexit legal advice on Monday. Opposition parties complained, after a fractious two-and-a-half-hour debate, that the summary legal advice released by Attorney General Geoffrey Cox did not comply with a Commons resolution agreed on November 13.

Compact for Migration

Breitbart
An official petition urging the British government to reject the United Nations’ Global Compact for Migration is close to 45,000 signatures, but Prime Minister Theresa May has yet to issue a response. The compact is reported to have been shaped in large part by the pro-mass migration government of Germany’s Angela Merkel — who launched an “unusually passionate” defence of the document in November — and has proved highly controversial, with countries led by national populist governments pulling out one after another as its shape has become clear. Leading the charge was the Donald Trump administration in the United States in late 2017, with the American ambassador to the United Nations.

Trade

Breitbart
Woody Johnson, President Trump’s Ambassador to the United Kingdom, has said that the U.S. is “ready to get straight to work” on a major trade deal with the UK, but included a major caveat, pointing out this could only happen “if Britain takes back control of its trade policy” after leaving the European Union. The Ambassador made clear the significant doubt the United States holds that the United Kingdom will ever truly break away from the European Union in any meaningful sense, a concern expressed earlier this week by President Trump himself after the details of Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit compromise “deal” became public.

UKIP

Mirror
Suzanne Evans has become the latest key player to quit Ukip over its growing association with the EDL founder Tommy Robinson. Party leader Gerard Batten won a confidence vote on Sunday after former leader Nigel Farage called for him to go over his associations with the far right. Ms Evans, who is a former deputy chair of the eurosceptic party, referred to the “obvious attempts by Gerard and Tommy Robinson to orchestrate a ‘Momentum-style’ takeover of UKIP”. She said she felt that the lack of action by the ruling NEC and the party’s remaining MEPs left her with “no option but to join the thousands of other good, decent former UKIP members in walking out of the door in disgust at the radical change in UKIP’s direction.”

Army

Mail
Looking like something from TV’s robot wars, this is the Army’s latest battlefield weapon. The remote-controlled mini-tank carries a gun and can be used to attack an enemy without putting troops at risk. Called Titan Strike, it has been undergoing initial tests on Salisbury Plain in Wiltshire, firing a laser beam to simulate live rounds of ammunition. It is controlled remotely by a soldier using a tablet computer to plot locations on a map and can also be driven remotely by joystick.  Cameras allow the operator to see down the barrel of the gun so they can decide when to fire.

Rail travel

Times
Chris Grayling should accept personal responsibility for the meltdown of rail timetables over the summer, MPs have said in a damning report. The transport secretary failed to avert the crisis that brought misery to millions of commuters after the biggest single change to train schedules attempted, a cross-party committee has concluded. The MPs found that Mr Grayling was at “the apex” of the hugely complex system controlling Britain’s railways and had the power to halt the changes. Although he was not given “all the information” required for a decision, the transport select committee found that he should have been “more proactive”.

Mail
A damning report on the summer timetable shambles has laid bare the dysfunctional chaos of Britain’s railways. Decision-making was ‘not fit for purpose’ and there was a ‘collective, system-wide failure’, said MPs. There was an ‘extraordinary complacency’ among government officials, rail bosses and regulators about ‘protecting the interests of passengers’, they added. Transport committee chairman Lilian Greenwood said the news last week of an average 3.1 per cent rise in fares added ‘insult to passengers’ injury’.

Education

Times
Sixteen grammar schools have agreed to relax admissions criteria and admit more poor children to qualify for part of a new £50 million fund to expand their school. The money will allow them to build classrooms and other facilities, making room for 4,000 more pupils. The schools, in 12 counties, were selected from 39 that applied for the first tranche of money made available by the government. Kent, which has the most grammar schools, has not had any bids accepted.

Mail
Universities must contact parents if students suffer a breakdown to help prevent suicide, the Education Secretary has said. Staff must do more to reach out to families because they are often best-placed to offer support, said Damian Hinds. It is especially important when youngsters have ‘left home for the first time’ and may not have their friends and relatives around them, he said. His warning comes after 11 students are thought to have killed themselves over the past two years at Bristol University. 

HS2

Times
The chairman of HS2 admitted yesterday that there was “still a lot of work to do” to deliver the project on time and on budget. Sir Terry Morgan, who is expected to be sacked today or tomorrow, said that it would be “very difficult” to make sure that the £56 billion project was built within its price. He said that senior managers were confident that the Y-shaped line, capable of carrying trains at 250mph, would be delivered in full but that it would be a “big challenge” to achieve government time and cost targets.

Dementia

Times
Thousands of people with dementia are needlessly sectioned because of bureaucratic delays and legal confusion, doctors and regulators say. Older people are confined to locked wards where they cannot even go for a cup of tea with relatives and face a struggle to get a care home place because they have been detained under the Mental Health Act. Doctors say that a review of the act, due this week, must address the confusion or the problem could worsen. Inspectors, doctors and human rights chiefs warn that the NHS is struggling to get to grips with a 2014 Supreme Court ruling that legal permission was required to care for patients who were not allowed to walk out of the door.

Cancer

Times
It is taking more than a year longer to develop cancer drugs than it did at the turn of the century, research suggests. For many cancers there had been few or no new drugs since 2000, despite huge advances in our understanding of the disease. The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) blamed red tape in research and approval processes for the delays. Professor Paul Workman, chief executive of the ICR, said that a “herd mentality” among pharmaceutical companies also meant that fewer highly innovative drugs reached the market.

NHS

Mail
Doctors and nurses believe hospital volunteers play a vital role in improving the experience of patients and staff, a landmark report concludes today. They say volunteers make a hugely important contribution relieving pressure on frontline NHS workers, the research found. In the study, the first of its kind, experts from Britain’s most respected health think-tank The King’s Fund, asked healthcare professionals how they perceived volunteers working in the NHS. They found that the overwhelming majority – 90 per cent – felt volunteers improved patient experience by ‘bringing human kindness’ to busy hospitals.

China

Times
The head of MI6 has questioned whether a Chinese telecoms giant should be involved in Britain’s next-generation mobile network amid fears over spying. Alex Younger, 55, said that “some decisions” about Huawei must be made after the US, New Zealand and Australia, all close intelligence partners, banned the company from providing technology for their 5G superfast networks. New Zealand said last week that the company posed “significant national security risks”. The US has repeatedly warned that Huawei’s ties to China’s government made its products vulnerable to espionage or interference.

Mail
The head of MI6 has raised concerns about Chinese companies building high-speed mobile internet networks in the UK. In a rare public appearance, Alex Younger said Britain needs to decide ‘the extent to which we would be comfortable’ with the Chinese owning our future high-speed internet networks. China is currently a world leader in developing 5G, a next generation mobile internet technology that promises to deliver much faster download speeds which could revolutionise connectivity.

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The Brexit Deal: Can Parliament be Scared into Submission?

As agreement is reached with the EU, Theresa May’s Brexit deal will come before parliament. In this contribution, Benjamin Martill, Dahrendorf Forum Post-Doctoral Fellow at LSE, breaks down the parliamentary arithmetic and assesses her options. My Kingdom for a Deal…

UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER

UNCONDITIONAL SURRENDER

 

 

Yesterday was the day our Government, in the form of our PM, unconditionally surrendered to the EU by signing the Withdrawal Agreement. The other, the winning side, not only jubilated – it is already tightening the screws even further. There are some very illuminating remarks made by EU ‘diplomats’ during that signing ‘ceremony’ yesterday.

For example, we read that, should our PM (sorry, my keyboard rejects typing her name) not get this wonderful surrender through Parliament, she’ll be expected to come back grovelling, trying to renegotiate with the victorious powers, but:

““We can change the staples and the colour of the paper, but beyond that, we can’t do much,” says a diplomat from a country usually friendly to the UK. “The EU will not give up the backstop. It cannot. So you can do some tweaks, but will that really make a difference?” Anything more fundamental, another EU diplomat warns, risks unravelling a deal which, while it may have left British MPs fuming, has also upset several EU member states who believe Michel Barnier gave up too much leverage by agreeing to write a customs deal into the divorce treaty.” (DT/paywalled).

The same chatty EU ‘diplomats’ had this to say about the Remainers’ hope for an extension to article 50:

“If the ‘no’ vote comes, there is a presumption that Article 50 could be briefly extended, until July at the latest, but only to enable the British to elect a new prime minister, hold a general election, a second referendum, a Norway/EFTA negotiation – or whatever else emerges. Even this is not guaranteed. […] there is also rising impatience with Britain’s inability to make it’s mind up. The EU side may think the best way to help is to sit on its hands. “The UK should not presume an extension,” says one wearied EU brexit negotiator, […]” (DT/paywalled).

EU ‘diplomats’ and by extension the leaders of the EU countries regard our, the 17.4 voters’ preferred option of leaving with ‘no deal’ and going for the WTO option, as ‘self-harm’. After all, sovereignty to them is harmful and Ms Merkel is on record saying that all EU countries must give up their sovereignty to the EU. From that point of view, it is unacceptable that we dare to want our country back, want to make our own laws, have control over our borders and specifically over our money and taxation. But the EU really does love us and just wants us back – under Brussel’s boots, of course. Mr Verhofstadt even remarked that they negotiated this treaty to ‘protect’ us poor Brits …

Mr Juncker and Mr Trajani (President of the EU Parliament) – our new would-be overlords – have already urged our MPs to accept this surrender and Spain has made their position clear, to the disgust of EU ‘diplomats’ who wish they had kept quiet. Mr Juncker’s remark shows why this demand came at an inopportune time, just before the signing of that Surrender Document, because it let the cat out of the bag re Gibraltar:

“Madrid successfully extracted statements of support from the EU27, and Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission. Speaking after the Brexit deal was endorsed, Mr Juncker said, “Please don’t underestimate the importance of this question for the kingdom of Spain.“We are with Spain,” he added in a clear sign that the EU would back Madrid over the Rock during the trade negotiations that will begin after Brexit Day on 29 March 2019.”(DT, paywalled, my bold).

As if to emphasise that it will be a free-for-all EU vultures to rip off the juicy bits of the UK corpse once this shameful document is agreed in Parliament, our dear neighbour from across the Channel has declared that he will ‘force’ the UK into the hated ‘backstop’ unless we agree to give up our rights to our own waters and ‘allow’ the French access to our fisheries (see here). The Dutch and Danish leaders have kept quiet about this so far, but they will certainly demand exactly the same. That means, should Parliament agree,  the choice for our country is between the devil and the blue sea: surrender our Fisheries, or surrender our Union thanks to the backstop. These won’t be the talking points our PM will mention when she goes on her ‘charm offensive’ to sell our surrender …

Two points are beyond my comprehension: why is it that even ‘leavers’ in Parliament are so scared of a clean break on WTO rules? John Redwood MP has made it clear again and again that there’s nothing scary about this. Also read this article by Stewart Jackson in today’s Brexit Central: “Parliament cannot simply ‘block No Deal’ as some are claiming – it’s the default option”. To me, it seems our MPs are thick, not us Leave voters!

And why is it that the powerful clique of Remainers, from our former PMs to Lords to MPs, never ever mentions the huge disadvantages of remaining? I’m not even talking about being subjugated to the ECJ and the ECHR, or about taking rules from Brussels without having a say. Being so keen on emphasising an economic catastrophe should we leave, how come they never mention that ‘getting back’ into the warm arms of Brussels means we’ll be liable to pay for the catastrophe that is the €urozone?

Liam Halligan has written a great article on this – again behind a paywall – where he describes the looming economic disaster, not least due to Italy’s budget proposals. He says that this issue has barely been on the horizon in the UK. I’ve certainly not heard Remainers mention it! His conclusion ought to stiffen the spines of Brexiteers to resist:

“it is an axiomatic truth that the EU remains blighted not just by rising populist outrage, but by an ill-designed and deeply dysfunctional monetary union – a union that will lurch back into a fully-blown crisis, which it lacks the fiscal and monetary scope to tackle, when the next global economic downturn hits in 2019 or 2020. This is the context in which British politicians are calling for a second referendum, lashing us to the EU. This is the background to Theresa May’s utter capitulation – backing a legally binding Withdrawal Agreement that vetoes a true Brexit and a non-binding “future relations” statement that’s nothing but warm words.” (my bold)

Indeed! Since our politicians – Leave and Remain MPs alike – are so focussed on Trade and the Economy instead of our Sovereignty, this quote ought to wake them up:  an economic disaster will be certain if we remain.

So write to your MPs, send them the link to the Cromwell speech and warn them that what the French “Gilets Jaunes” can do, we can do better!

 

 

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Go – in the name of God, begone & let us have done with you!

Go – in the name of God, begone & let us have done with you!

 

 

Watch Cromwell’s speech to the Rump Parliament:

 

 

Please forward and share this with others if you care about your country !

 

This video was produced by Brian Cooke, the speech is performed by Richard Ford, both UKIP SW, who have given us permission to publish it on this site.

 

The post Go – in the name of God, begone & let us have done with you! appeared first on UKIP Daily | UKIP News | UKIP Debate.

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